Crochet blanket

 

Christine brought along her crochet blanket kit on Monday. We just loved it. We loved the mandalas, the grannie squares, the colours , the look. It is vibrant and has such a high visual appeal. It is painstaking work and is taking time but Christine likes that sort of a challenge. This will be a stunning blanket when it is finished. It is already impressive.

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Show and tell

After the extreme heat at the weekend it was nice to gather by the ocean on a lovely day to spin. It then started to get humid again! We had had a productive , happy day , though.

Show and tell March 4th

 

Maria for a beautiful crotcheted granny square rug in lovely vibrant colours

Marina: a rug made up of small left over fibres in multi shades of autumn, small skein of pink & white spun wool.

Cathy: a small poncho for her baby granddaughter in granny squares & autumn shades, a knitted felted beanie in browns, 2 balls spun wool in orange & browns,

Hilary: a child’s rabbit blanket knitted in white chenille.

Peter: finished Sheppard’s coat.

John : working on another shopping bag straps from the warp last week.

It’s all Clarrie’s fault!

needle felted diaporamaAlan is someone who shows us how to just take life’s experiences, good or bad, and make them work for you. His flexible thinking has enabled him to take on so many creative opportunities because Alan sees everything as a challenge rather than a block. Sonya, our roving reporter, brings you his story this week:

Like some of the wool we spin up, our Alan is indeed a rare breed! He is one of four precious males in our group. To be cherished and wondered at. But not merely because of his rarity but because of his  prodigious output of felted articles. When I mused that he must have made good money out of all this, Alan assured me that has not been the case. He has given away most of his creations!

In 2008 I brought my wife Andrea along to Seaford Spinners to get some advice about her craft work. (You Tube does all that nowadays) The 3rd time I brought Andrea along, Clarrie waylaid me and I just went on from there.

Prior to that I had no experience of spinning at all. I had gone to a felting workshop in Tasmania instructing us on how to felt a hat. I later learnt how to make beanies. But I used the advice given there, as what not to do when felting a hat! So I was a raw recruit when Clarrie got on to me. I used the worst wool imaginable when I started spinning. Short  dirty wool. It was like an anchor rope . I remember Clarrie saying ‘If you can spin that, you’ll be able to spin anything!’   I eventually  got enough wool spun up, to make a really good beanie. Someone else knitted it for me.

I use a circular loom now to make beanies because I’ve never really got into knitting. I leave that for Andrea who is a really good knitter.  (who does remarkably delicate gossamer work.)

As I watch Alan spinning silk looking nearly as fine as a spider web, I think he’s achieved amazing quality and output since his relatively recent debut in 2008.

In 2009 I called in on Highland Felting in Oberon NSW. I bought a book, some foam, some needles and some batts. I had a 10 minute verbal instruction on how to make a hat. Then I went back to the campground where we were staying in Canberra and made one! I’ve made a lot of hats since then. I’ve run workshops here and at Aldinga. I’ve also made some big felted bags, scarves and wraps.

One year we all had to make a doll to hang on the Christmas tree. Most people knitted theirs, but I felted mine. It was a figure that was me.

I started needle felting when doing hats and since then I’ve felted a lot of 3D miniature doggies. One year for the Royal Show I made stand up figures of me and the group of 7 dogs I was showing (See that amazing picture).I won 1st prize for that. I’ve even felted fish! I’m currently needle felting a picture of a poodle, and I’m using dog’s hair. I use a colour print on the paper, and I work on either a canvas or paper. If its paper, I just pull it away when I’ve done my felting. When using a canvas, I can print up the background and needle felt the dog straight on to that.

So here I am today busy with my felting, and thinking it all started with Clarrie, rounding me up and teaching me to spin. So you could sort of say that all this is Clarrie’s fault!   (and what a marvellous fault, dear Clarrie!)

Needlefelted poodle

We have been enjoying watching Alan’s needlefelted poodle being developed each week. Last week he was needlepointing in a way that sounded like a steam train and we all wanted to woo-woo! This week he was working on the body and is getting an interesting look. It’s very effective in contrast to the darker parts. He has had to  think hard about this and the face will take time and patience. He actually breeds and shows these dogs so this is a picture of a dog he had. She became a dancing dog and looked beautiful dressed up in her show clothes and loved performing. She was always a bit of a star, apparently, so it all worked out well for her. We look forward to seeing the finished picture but , meanwhile , we are enjoying the journey. It’s a lot of work and stabbing!