Spinning the blues

We are never blue when we are spinning but it is always amazing to see the number of variations on blue that we have. We can buy blue to spin or dye our own. We never tire of blue, probably because we spin by the ocean and constantly have that view to inspire us. Working with fibre is healing and relaxing. You just want to get that lovely colour and spin.

Health benefits of yarncrafting

Mental Health Benefits of Slow Yarn

 

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Waste not, want not

We love using up our bits and left overs and we love coming up with different ideas for oddments. We do not like seeing anything go to waste and it is always a good creative adventure. This week Alexis was plying more of the spun wool she had made for her merino tops left overs. She is mixing in a very vibrant green which pulls all the other colours together but creates an interesting visual effect. Cathy had sat down with her bag of left over spun wool bits and started crocheting a hat. Free form crochet meant she could mix the colours in however she felt and it’s a nice, warm, woolly hat with an interesting texture.

Waste not, want not

We like our leftovers and oddments. We enjoy finding ways to use them and combine them. Our “bits” often provide us with a creative challenge and they always involve us with colour. Alexis was using up all the merino tops bits she had left over from spinning and dyeing. She had carded them into richly coloured , interesting wool batts. The phone image doesn’t do the colours justice. The next part of the creative adventure is spinning the colours and then seeing how different it all looks. The finished wool will then look different again depending upon what other colours you combine it with and whether you crochet, knit, felt or weave it. The oddments always provide a challenge which makes you think and use all your skills.

Pomegranate dye

pomegranate dyeCathy dyed some English Leiceister fleece with pomegranate seeds and skins. The fleece was white but after being in the pot for hours it became, well, sheep coloured. A creamy, yellowish colour like wheat. Pomegranates are high in tannic acid so you do not need a mordant. The net bag got eaten through though ,which was a first for her  when using natural dyes. It wasn’t a problem…big sieves work well.

She carded it and is now mixing that to make wool batts which include a bit of sage green merino tops and some gold thread. All of that looks good together and we look forward to seeing how it spins up.

The yarn on the right has been dyed with onion skins and then there is some yellow merino tops and white alpaca mixed in.