Weaving wonders

weavingJohn and Peter are very productive and are always creating something interesting on their looms. Peter has really only just begun to weave but he loves it so he is learning quickly. John has a lot of experience and has been very helpful to Peter. We like seeing what they are doing and are always amazed with the level of skill and then the patience setting up the looms and making the cloth. Peter’s new pattern is coming along nicely and it is destined to be a rucksack. John is currently working on an American Colonial pattern. Those patterns favoured red and white and blue and white. Originally people were not allowed to weave in America. They had to send the raw fibres to Britain and then bring it back as woven cloth. You cannot stop people , though.   Weaving cotton, linen and wool was popular. John’s  red and white piece is looking lovely and such a good design.

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Husky fur scarf

husky fur scarfRecently we showed Christine spinning the husky fur she had. She turned the spun yarn into a woven scarf and it looks different. Good different. It has a substantial texture without being thick. It has a real warmth and cosiness. The slightly open weave allows an appreciation of the fibre but creates air pockets for extra warmth. The fringe is a good idea because it allows you to appreciate the husky fur. This is no ordinary scarf and it’s a great addition to a winter wardrobe.

Show and tell

show and tell 8th April

Marjorie: a very colourful beret.

Jan 1: a beanie in autumn colours

Marina :1. Spun ball of purple/multi coloured tops, 1. Ball of dark brown spun with orange/pinks, a cotton knitted/crotched square.

Marina also purchased 2 small toys from the hospital craft shop.

Hilary: a lime green beanie in cable stitch

Sheila: a baby quilt for her new 10 week old granddaughter & a nursing apron for her daughter-in-law.

Peter: working on his ruck sack

John: working on his second strap for his shopping bag.

The ocean looked stunning but it was very blowy down on the beach front. it was lucky we were inside with all our chat and ideas. We could value the great view without getting blown away.

Christies Beach South Australia

Spinning mentor

This week Sonya, our roving reporter, brings you Christine ‘s story. Her crescent shawl continues to be one of our top posts. She has mentored new members in spinning and weaving . She supports them strongly at the start and then gives them so many ideas and pushes them to fly and believe in themselves. She is confidence-inspiring with yarn arts because she is so passionate about  them:

Christine is a most gifted and creative person you could ever come across. And laced with such kindness of heart. She willingly teaches newbies how to spin, weave, do complex knitting,  or manoeuvre their way into a puzzling spinning wheel., spin chunky yarn, use an  obscure sock loom etc etc.   Can’t do something? Need the shelves of patterns sorted? Take you to the airport? Do a stint at the Royal Adelaide Show? Just ask dear Christine. Oh it’s too late! She’s already offered before being asked. Every club should have a Christine. Here is her story which she assured me there was nothing about her, to write.

I’ve knitted for as long as I can remember. My mother was pleased she could teach me because my two sisters just didn’t cotton on to knitting. But for all that there was a lot of skill in my family. One of my brothers and his son built their entire house. Another brother has renovated and redecorated his house. One of my sisters is brilliant at sewing, making curtains and such, and so clever with macramé. And the other sister is just so socially gifted.

I was sixteen when I knitted my first cardigan. When my children were young I remember knitting seven jumpers for them in seven months. My wrists were so sore that I threw out my needles and the rest of my wool, vowing never to knit again.

After that I don’t think I picked up my knitting needles for some years. Then a friend gave me a cross stitch tapestry, a white work project and a long stitch tapestry. That all got me going again. I decided I would make hardanger embroidery my specialty.

When my neighbour and friend Beryl showed me her spinning wheel and told me about the process of washing, carding, spinning and then knitting, I thought to myself –what fool would go through all of that?

I started coming along with Beryl to Seaford Spinners and Weavers because I decided I wanted to learn how to spin. However I had   no intention of joining up.  I learnt to spin on the wheel I borrowed from my sister who keeps it as an ornament and is not interested in using it. I took to spinning and loved it. I still find it relaxing and I feel kind of secure, behind a spinning wheel.