Needle felted poodle

We have watched Alan needle felt this poodle picture from the first piece of fibre. It has been an interesting , creative journey. Alan  put a lot of thought into how he was going to create the poodle. He has used an unusual fibres mix for the body . He had to think about the face and features. One of the things Alan does is get our input and then feedback online. That’s something we can all do these days: put our things online and garner peer review and support. For him , it was all helpful and so he could finish this lovely picture very confidently.

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Show and tell

Show and tell was at our Christmas break up lunch today. We don’t see each other now until the middle of January but we certainly have plenty of ideas and good cheer to keep us going.

 

10th December show and tell

show and tell 10th December

Janette: Lemons and bay leaves

Hilary: Gumeracha Newsletter and our annual newsletter

Cathy: Cake of Border Leicester dyed with avocado skins and pips which had turned out tan rather than the expected rose pink. Yellow merino tops plied with lightly dyed onion skin Border Leicester, wool batt ( fawn fleece, yellow Finn X and light alpaca ) plied with Corriedale and one plied light yellow merino tops.

Alan: Needle felted poodle picture in custom rare fleece and dark fleece.

Marina: spun cotton in red white and blue, spun wool batt from Alexis in red and salmon pink, crocheted handspun acrylic squares in hot pink plied with cotton. Spun alpaca fleece in white.

John: woven place mats in a variety of strong colours. A red scarf made in fine wool . He is donating both of these to the club for fund raising.

It’s all Clarrie’s fault!

needle felted diaporamaAlan is someone who shows us how to just take life’s experiences, good or bad, and make them work for you. His flexible thinking has enabled him to take on so many creative opportunities because Alan sees everything as a challenge rather than a block. Sonya, our roving reporter, brings you his story this week:

Like some of the wool we spin up, our Alan is indeed a rare breed! He is one of four precious males in our group. To be cherished and wondered at. But not merely because of his rarity but because of his  prodigious output of felted articles. When I mused that he must have made good money out of all this, Alan assured me that has not been the case. He has given away most of his creations!

In 2008 I brought my wife Andrea along to Seaford Spinners to get some advice about her craft work. (You Tube does all that nowadays) The 3rd time I brought Andrea along, Clarrie waylaid me and I just went on from there.

Prior to that I had no experience of spinning at all. I had gone to a felting workshop in Tasmania instructing us on how to felt a hat. I later learnt how to make beanies. But I used the advice given there, as what not to do when felting a hat! So I was a raw recruit when Clarrie got on to me. I used the worst wool imaginable when I started spinning. Short  dirty wool. It was like an anchor rope . I remember Clarrie saying ‘If you can spin that, you’ll be able to spin anything!’   I eventually  got enough wool spun up, to make a really good beanie. Someone else knitted it for me.

I use a circular loom now to make beanies because I’ve never really got into knitting. I leave that for Andrea who is a really good knitter.  (who does remarkably delicate gossamer work.)

As I watch Alan spinning silk looking nearly as fine as a spider web, I think he’s achieved amazing quality and output since his relatively recent debut in 2008.

In 2009 I called in on Highland Felting in Oberon NSW. I bought a book, some foam, some needles and some batts. I had a 10 minute verbal instruction on how to make a hat. Then I went back to the campground where we were staying in Canberra and made one! I’ve made a lot of hats since then. I’ve run workshops here and at Aldinga. I’ve also made some big felted bags, scarves and wraps.

One year we all had to make a doll to hang on the Christmas tree. Most people knitted theirs, but I felted mine. It was a figure that was me.

I started needle felting when doing hats and since then I’ve felted a lot of 3D miniature doggies. One year for the Royal Show I made stand up figures of me and the group of 7 dogs I was showing (See that amazing picture).I won 1st prize for that. I’ve even felted fish! I’m currently needle felting a picture of a poodle, and I’m using dog’s hair. I use a colour print on the paper, and I work on either a canvas or paper. If its paper, I just pull it away when I’ve done my felting. When using a canvas, I can print up the background and needle felt the dog straight on to that.

So here I am today busy with my felting, and thinking it all started with Clarrie, rounding me up and teaching me to spin. So you could sort of say that all this is Clarrie’s fault!   (and what a marvellous fault, dear Clarrie!)

Needle felted poodle

standard poodle needle feltedWe’d like to congratulate Alan on this third place prize at the Royal Adelaide Show this year for his needle felted poodle. It is a replica of his own award winning standard poodle and he used the hair he had brushed from her. We watched him making this from scratch. He had brought the fibre, his needles and equipment and a photo of his beautiful dog. He was thinking it out carefully as he created this picture. The competition must have been really strong because this was a beautifully made image of his dog. He particularly thought out the eyes and nose. He thinks he maybe should not have put it behind glass because you don’t see the full effect of the fibre and expertise. We were really impressed and we are very proud of Alan. Well done!