Sleeveless jacket

knitted sleeveless jacketThis sleeveless jacket is knitted in one piece on round needles. Marjorie has dyed all the wool for it and spun it and now she has nearly finished her jacket. We can’t wait to see it when it is finished. It is a beautiful colour. It is thick and warm and will provide some good protection against the cold . it’s colour will be cheerful in winter. She is thinking of maybe putting some pearl buttons on the lapels.

There are some one piece knitting patterns on In the Loop if you want to try something like that.

 

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Handpainting fibre

A lot of people like to hand paint dyes onto fibre because you can get some interesting effects. If you use darker colours, you get some really good colours , too. You need a good work space area and a place you can keep clean easily and then plenty of plastic and protective layers and rubber gloves. It doesn’t need to be messy but better to  be prudent prepare for that eventuality . In the end it is fun and creative. WoolWench provides  clear instructions.

Knitted beret

 

Berets make a nice change from beanies and give a different look. They can also use up small quantities of yarn. Cabling, Fair Isle and then yarn weight will all change the look of the beret. Sheila’s beret has a little top knot and a bow to decorate it. Her midnight blue homespun wool looks really lovely and her beret can be used with jeans or with a nice navy outfit.

There are some good beret patterns on AllFreeKnitting.

Rose Fibre

Rose fibre is obviously celullose based. It is one of the plant fibres which is becoming increasingly popular , partly because people are experimenting with unusual fibres and partly because vegans do not want to use animal based fibres. It is completely sustainable and eco-friendly. It can be mixed in with other fibres to increase the drape of the knitted, felted or crocheted fabric. If you are going to dye it, you need to ensure you are using a dye suitable for cellulose based fibres. It’s easy to spin but if you watch the video you can see how the woman pulls the fibres apart and loosens them before she spins them. It adds sheen and shine. We are all looking forward to using our rose fibre which we have bought this year but haven’t yet worked out how we are going to use it. Are we going to spin it separately , as this woman has, or are we going to mix it in with other fibres? Rose fibre is regenerated and similar to bamboo. The plats are broken down to the cellulose and the fibre is made from that. Different from cotton which is produced directly from the plant.