Christmas Lunch

Christmas lunchChristmas lunchAt our last meeting we celebrated the end of our year with a lovely Christmas Lunch. Marjorie and Pam ensured everyone was properly served. John, Christine and Sonya made sure the dishes were done and then people like Wendy and Margaret made sure it was all running smoothly. Peter and Marina took photos. We all pitched in where necessary and it was a truly cheerful, Christmas event. We stopped to gather around the big table to eat lunch together and to chat. Not that we ever stop talking. One of the great things about our group is we are full of ideas and information to share and so it never stops. We were happy to get back to our wheels and creativity afterwards. Our Kris Kringle presents had had to be something we would use to do with our yarn arts and crafts and there were some lovely ideas and people brought along thoughtful presents so everyone was a winner. Nothing like something new to play with. Christine had brought her little electric Eel Wheel to spin on and we still love it. She had also brought along the most interesting folding stool which was easy to carry, easy to put up and then, as she showed us at lunch time, could double as a solid little table as well. How convenient 🙂

We have had a good year. We have run some very successful events to fund raise for charity and we have had some successes with our things going into exhibitions and shows. Our workshops have been inspiring and we have produced some really creative items this year. We had plenty to celebrate and look forward to another good year next year.

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Needle felted poodle

We have watched Alan needle felt this poodle picture from the first piece of fibre. It has been an interesting , creative journey. Alan  put a lot of thought into how he was going to create the poodle. He has used an unusual fibres mix for the body . He had to think about the face and features. One of the things Alan does is get our input and then feedback online. That’s something we can all do these days: put our things online and garner peer review and support. For him , it was all helpful and so he could finish this lovely picture very confidently.

Equipment Day

Equipment Day was a huge success and this won’t be the only post! We started at 9am and got back home at 5pm. Such a big day but all inspiring , energising and just plain fun. We spent over 3 hours in the mini bus going from the southern suburbs to the hills and then from the hills to the northern suburbs and then from there back down to the ocean. It was beautifully sunny over the ocean when we got back and so good to see.

Adelaide Hills spinning group gave us a warm welcome and Pauline gave us an official welcome later in the morning. It is so civilised to be greeted by china cups and saucers and some nice morning tea delights. Lunch was thoughtfully planned too. In the middle we did our chatting, looking around and buying. We got plenty of goodies and we even won raffle prizes this year which really added to our enjoyment  of the day.

On the long, but pleasant , bus trips 3 of us were using the time to get some knitting done. Cathy finished her fluffy , puffy, pastel beanie and the group decision was to put on a pompom. Sonya got her knitted slippers from Hilary’s pattern well underway. Margaret was working on her 10 stitch blanket and was enjoying it until the bumpy ride started to make the stitches slide off her needles. That meant she was forced to talk and talk and talk like the rest of us. We didn’t stop talking and shared so many ideas.

The trip out to handcrafted gifts for the rare and natural fibres was well worth it. We had a warm and homely welcome. Some of us purchased the rose fibre (made from roses) and the camelhair mixed with silk. Others got Shetland wool and basically we were thrilled to bits with the textures, colours and range of choices….and the cat!

All in all , it was a very worthwhile day so we’ll blog different aspects of it as we go along.

Our intrepid adventurer

beret hilaryHilary has travelled widely and brings that keen sense of adventure to her spinning. She comfortably works with fluorescent and ultra bright colours and can combine them very successfully. She understands the magic of yarn and can make some very whimsical items which are very appealing and then she’ll suddenly blow us away with something like her stunning full length jacket which we all loved. Sonya , our roving reporter , is bringing us her story this week:

 

 

 

 

Hilary Our hero and Historian.

We’ve lived in Seaford since 1972.  (I detect some stability here!)

Mum always used to knit for me and I sewed for Mum. (And I detect some notable generosity here.) My friend introduced me to spinning. At that time Eunice was asked to start up a group for women in the area. My friend found out about Eunice who had a group meeting at her home. We went there, with Eunice insisting that as we were beginners at spinning, we should start off by using a drop spindle!! (Let me assure you dear readers that the ancient art of using a spindle is not for the faint hearted, clumsy, or like me, the slow to learn.)

Eunice was very arty and crafty. As a weaver, she used the materials around and available.  E.g. for dyeing she used whatever plants or leaves she thought might be worth a try.  We had all sorts of workshops- dyeing, weaving, and felting. We explored the elements of making things with all sorts of fibres, such as wool, alpaca, silk etc. All this was done at her own home but even then it was known as the Seaford Spinners. The first place the group moved into when our numbers grew, was a church hall.

I bought a wheel which was a copy of the standard Ashford and I’ve never really stopped spinning since then.

When we were in Saudi Arabia in 1983-87 I took my wheel and fleece with me. I couldn’t buy any fleece there, so I used to ask anyone coming back from being on leave to bring fleeces and wool and other bits and pieces. In those times visitors were not allowed in Saudi, but we, with our work visas were allowed to come and go. At the end of the four years I sold my wheel and some fleece to an American woman whom I taught to spin. I had a break for about 15 years while we were travelling. (Lucky things!) Then I re-joined Seaford Spinners while they were occupying the bowling club at the top of the hill leading down to the Port Noarlunga village. (With the world’s most magnificent view, I reckon). When we had to vacate from there, we moved down the hill to the sunny little CWA hall. We eventually outgrew that venue and thanks to Clarrie whose son was the Commodore of the Yacht Club, we are here to this day. (With another magnificent view of the sea, which nearly laps at our verandah!)

What Hilary hasn’t talked about are the many years she has carried a load of responsibilities in the Seaford Spinners. She has worked tirelessly and unobtrusively at organizing workshops, bus outings, opening and closing the rooms, club celebrations, Christmas festivities, writing up the minutes, running meetings, and all those things that “someone needs to do something about”.  In spite of all this, Hilary is a regular contributor to our Show and Tell table, with works of wonderful colours and beautiful craftsmanship.