Pomegranate dye

pomegranate dyeCathy dyed some English Leiceister fleece with pomegranate seeds and skins. The fleece was white but after being in the pot for hours it became, well, sheep coloured. A creamy, yellowish colour like wheat. Pomegranates are high in tannic acid so you do not need a mordant. The net bag got eaten through though ,which was a first for her  when using natural dyes. It wasn’t a problem…big sieves work well.

She carded it and is now mixing that to make wool batts which include a bit of sage green merino tops and some gold thread. All of that looks good together and we look forward to seeing how it spins up.

The yarn on the right has been dyed with onion skins and then there is some yellow merino tops and white alpaca mixed in.

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Where did you get that hat?

 

We had some lovely hats again this week and ones which made us think . Top left is Marina’s spun wool beanie which was cosy and warm . She’d actually used the pattern from Christine’s tubular socks because she thought it would work well on a beanie and it does. It makes it warmer than if you knitted it flat and it also gives it a bit of a life visually. She then made another beanie, on the right, using the same pattern but using her spun wool batts plied with cotton. It looks quite different from the other one even though it is the same pattern. Both of the beanies look comfortable.

Underneath are Hilary’s two berets from her spun wool. The first one , to the left, has some soft green at the edge and then the bright colours in the middle. The second one is just such a glorious riot of green and other colours. Like Marjories’ beret last week it is a celebration of colour. Both of these berets are cheerful and guaranteed to beat the winter blues. Colour therapy works.

Show and tell

Marina : 2 balls of spun yarn in muted pastel shades of blue, 1 yellow/cream mix, 2 beanies in a spiral rib orange/cream, 1 ribbed in a blue mixture.

Cathy :2 carded batts yellow with muted green & gold thread carded through. Pomegranate natural dye.

Sheila: showed us the finished jumper she was working on last week in a photo on her phone:Granddaughter wearing the jumper.

Hilary :2 berets in very bright multi-coloured greens, 1 skein of spun Ashford wool/silk mix.

John : the weaver has started a new project weave a heritage pattern for a table runner.

Peter ,John’s apprentice, is working on his ruck sack.

Maria : a sample of a colourful crazy crotchet square.

Husky yarn

Christine was spinning husky yarn today and it looked like fun. It was white and fluffy and looked like rabbit’s fur. She had brought along plenty of bags of it so that if anyone else wanted to try it they could. There were takers because it is a nice challenge. We were wondering if you could felt it but dog fur doesn’t usually felt. It can matt so we were wondering if you could card it in with other felting fibres. Our idea was to make husky slippers. They’d be so soft and warm. We also thought it would be good to card the husky fur in with wool and alpaca before spinning. What Christine was spinning , though, looked really nice and we look forward to seeing the finished yarn.